52 in ’11: This Dark Endeavour by Kenneth Oppel

The project where I read a book a week this year. See more about my project here (and feel free to leave your book suggestions). You can read my other 52 in ’11 posts here.

Book 27: This Dark Endeavour by Kenneth Oppel
Rating:
Good read

This review is going to be a little different. I did read this book, but I read as part of a freelance story I wrote for the Star.

Since it might be a conflict to review it for these purposes, I thought I’d link to my story at the Star. But I did read it, so I’m counting it toward my 52.

Feel free to disagree with me about that in the comments.

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52 in ’11: Close Your Eyes by Amanda Eyre Ward

The project where I read a book a week this year. See more about my project here (and feel free to leave your book suggestions). You can read my other 52 in ’11 posts here.

Book 24: Close Your Eyes by Amanda Eyre Ward
My rating: An interesting thriller

Close Your Eyes tells the story of Lauren, who’s father murdered her mother when she was six years old. Flashforward to the future where Lauren is grown, but still cannot shake her past. He brother, Alex, goes missing while working for Doctors Without Borders, and suddenly Lauren is thrown into a world of determining whether her father is rightfully in prison for the murder of her mother.

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52 in ’11: Falling Backwards by Jann Arden

The project where I read a book a week this year. See more about my project here (and feel free to leave your book suggestions). You can read my other 52 in ’11 posts here.

Book 25: Falling Backwards by Jann Arden
My rating: Must-read

OK, I admit, being a fan of Jann Arden’s might make me a little bias to review her book in a fair and just manner. However, don’t let that dissuade you. Arden’s memoir, which takes us through her childhood pretty much up until she signs her record deal at the age of 30, is one of the best books I’ve read this year (and I’ve been aiming to read a lot.)

This is not Arden’s first book — she has published two other which were based off her online journal entries (Arden’s never called it a blog, so I’m hesitant to call it a blog). Those books are far different from Falling Backwards. If I Knew, Don’t You Think I’d Tell You  and I’ll Tell You One Thing, and That’s All I Knew were written in an abstract tone. (And as an Arden fan, I’ll even admit I was not a fan). Falling Backwards is not like the books that preceded it.

At a speaking engagement for her book last month, Arden told me that because of that, writing this book was much harder than the two that came before it.

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52 in ’11: The One that I Want by Allison Winn Scotch

The project where I read a book a week this year. See more about my project here (and feel free to leave your book suggestions). You can read my other 52 in ’11 posts here.

Book 23: The One that I Want by Allison Winn Scotch
My rating: Something to chew on

The One that I Want tries to be more than it is.

At its heart, it’s a chick lit book. Our main character, Tilly, is married, happy and trying to have a baby.

Suddenly, she is given the gift (or curse) of being able to see the future by visions she gets when she look at photographs she has taken. She gets these “powers” after visiting an old childhood friend who’s giving psychic readings at a fair.

Soon, Tilly’s father begins drinking again and gets in a car accident, her troublesome sister moves in and Tilly’s husband leaves her. What’s a girl to do?

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52 in ’11: Like Me by Chely Wright

The project where I read a book a week this year. See more about my project here (and feel free to leave your book suggestions). You can read my other 52 in ’11 posts here.

Book 22: Like Me by Chely Wright
My rating: Worth the read

It seems every celebrity is coming out with an autobiography these days.

Some are just full of name-dropping, some are funny, some were likely just written for the paycheque.

And then there are memories like country singer Chely Wright.

I was curious to pick up this book when it first came out last year when Wright officially announced she was gay. For a hardcore country singer in Nashville, that was kind of shocking. I was curious to read more about how hard it must have been for Wright to keep who she was under wraps for so long.

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